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Kate Micucci
Kate Micucci
Full name: Kate Ann Micucci
Birth date: March 31, 1980 (age 38)
Birth place: Jeresy City, New Jeresy, U.S.
Occupation: Actress
voice actress
comedian
singer-songwriter

Kate Ann Micucci (born March 31, 1980) is an American actress, voice actress, for Regular Show who is well known for Sadie Miller in Steven Universe, Velma Dinkley in Be Cool, Scooby-Doo!, Sara Murphy in Milo Murphy's Law and Webby Vanderquack in DuckTales.

Early Life

Born in Jersey City, New Jersey, of Italian ancestry,[1] Micucci was raised in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, in the Lehigh Valley region of the state, where she first learned to play classical piano, taught by her mother.[2] She graduated in 1998 from Nazareth Area High School.[3] Micucci then received an A.A. in Fine Arts from Keystone College in La Plume, Pennsylvania, and a bachelor of arts in studio Art in 2003[4] from Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles.

Career

Micucci's TV credits include numerous television commercials, as well as Toni the barista on NBC's Four Kings, guest roles on Malcolm in the Middle, 'Til Death, How I Met Your Mother, Cory in the House, and Campus Ladies, and recurring roles on Scrubs and Raising Hope. Her film credits include The Last Hurrah, Bart Got a Room, and When in Rome. She plays Lily the IT girl on Elevator produced by HBO's Runawaybox.[5] In early 2009, she released a five-track EP entitled Songs.[6] Micucci appeared in five episodes of Scrubs ("My Lawyer's in Love", "My Absence", "My Chief Concern", "Our Histories", and "My Finale") as Stephanie Gooch, a ukulele player with whom Ted Buckland begins a relationship. She performs her song "Mr. Moon" and an adapted version of "Fuck You" (retitled "Screw You" for ABC), a song she typically performs as part of the musical duo Garfunkel and Oates. In 2009, she starred in the short film Imaginary Larry, co-written and co-directed by Riki Lindhome, her partner in Garfunkel and Oates. In August 2009, Micucci appeared in an advertising campaign for Hillshire Farms and for H & R Block in January 2010.


Performing as Garfunkel And Oates with Riki Lindhome at Upright Citizens Brigade Theater in 2009 Micucci performs "Playin' with Micucci" on third Mondays at the Steve Allen Theater on Hollywood Boulevard, in Hollywood, California,[7] most recently in August[8] and October 2011.[9] In the act, she presents "songs and stories in [a] musical variety show."[10][11] Micucci says the title is the only dirty aspect of the show. She can also frequently be seen performing with Lindhome in "An Evening with Garfunkel and Oates" at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater in Los Angeles.[12] She performed with William H. Macy on the ukulele to promote the DVD release of the film Bart Got a Room. The video has been circulated around the Internet on sites such as YouTube and The Huffington Post.[13] In 2010, Micucci appeared in the Kristen Bell film When in Rome and in an episode in the sixth season of the TV show Weeds as a slightly sedated waitress. She appeared in some episodes of the HBO series, Bored to Death and appeared as the babysitter/dogsitter/eldersitter Shelley in the series Raising Hope. In February 2011, Micucci appeared briefly in a Progressive Insurance ad as a waitress.[14] She has also voiced a character on Pendleton Ward's animated series Adventure Time, and as the character of Julie Kane on the Disney XD animated series Motorcity. She also voices the recurring character Sadie on the Cartoon Network animated series Steven Universe. In July 2012, Kate appeared in Written by a Kid's production Scary Smash, a Geek and Sundry creation that was executive produced by Kim Evey, Felicia Day, and Sheri Byrant.[15] In January 2013, Micucci's casting was announced for a recurring role on The Big Bang Theory as "a potential love interest for ... Raj."[16] Her character, the painfully shy Lucy, first appeared on February 14, 2013. Micucci appeared as a guest judge on King of the Nerds. As of October 2015 she provides the voice of Velma Dinkley in the series Be Cool, Scooby-Doo!, briefly sharing with Mindy Cohn in other forms of media before taking over full-time. In 2016, she appeared in season one, episode six in the Netflix comedy-drama series, Easy along with Orlando Bloom and Malin Akerman.

Playwright

Shawn's early plays, such as Marie and Bruce (1978), portrayed emotional and sexual conflicts in an absurdist style, with language that was both lyrical and violent. In a conversation with Andre Gregory, parts of which were used to create My Dinner with Andre, Shawn referred to these plays as depicting "my interior life as a raging beast." Critical response was extremely polarized: some critics hailed Shawn as a major writer, while John Simon called Marie and Bruce "garbage" and described Shawn as "one of the unsightliest actors in this city."[8] His 1977 play A Thought in Three Parts caused controversy in London when the production was investigated by a vice squad and attacked in Parliament after allegations of pornographic content.[9] He was also awarded the Obie Award for best playwrighting in 1974 for his play Our Late Night.[10]

His later plays became more overtly political, drawing parallels between the psychology of his characters and the behavior of governments and social classes. Among the best-known of these are Aunt Dan and Lemon (1985) and The Designated Mourner (1997). Shawn's political work has invited controversy, as he often presents the audience with several contradictory points of view, such as Aunt Dan and Lemon, which Shawn described as a cautionary tale against fascism. The monologue The Fever, originally created by Shawn to be performed for small audiences in apartments, describes a person who becomes sick while struggling to find a morally consistent way to live when faced with injustice, and harshly criticizes the record of the United States in supporting oppressive anti-communist regimes. In 1997, Shawn discussed the political nature of Aunt Dan and Lemon, The Fever and The Designated Mourner in an interview in which he talked extensively about the thematic developments between the three plays, as well as his own views on Marxist, communistand socialist politics, their relevance to American liberalism, and how government and individual responsibilities for finding solutions to the dichotomy between rich and poor in the world take hold in the characters presented in his plays.[11] Aunt Dan and Lemon earned Shawn his second Obie Award for excellence in playwrighting in 1986,[12] and The Feverwon Best American Play in 1991.[13] Shawn's four plays have been adapted into films: The Designated Mourner (basically a film version of David Hare's stage production), Marie and Bruce, My Dinner with Andre and The Fever. Oscar winner Vanessa Redgrave stars in The Fever (2004),[14] which first aired on HBO on June 13, 2007.

Shawn has also written political commentary for The Nation, and in 2004 he published the one-issue-only progressive political magazine Final Edition, which featured interviews with and articles by Jonathan Schell, Noam Chomsky, Mark Strand and Deborah Eisenberg. Shawn is credited as translator of Bertolt Brecht's The Threepenny Opera, which opened at Studio 54 in Manhattan on March 25, 2006. He appears briefly in voice-over during "Song about the Futility of Human Endeavor". He published his first nonfiction work, Essays, on September 1, 2009. It is a collection of essays that expresses his perceptions of politics and other subjects that reflect an aspect of his life.


Voice credits

Season 8

Personal Life

Micucci married musician and recording producer Jake Sinclair in February 2018.[17] They live in Los Angeles and New York.[18]

External Links

Wikipedia article on Kate Micucci

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